Meow Mixx: The Search For the UK’s Drag Race Ambassador

With my début here at NotSafe4Werk.com as their new UK correspondent, my new home for dishing all the T (and crumpets) over on this side of the pond, what better way to kick if off than by covering what’s on everyone’s minds over here; Ru herself coming to London! With RuPaul’s Drag Race UK ever looming around the corner, Ru herself has collaborated with the UK’s truTV to search for a UK drag queen to represent the show. Queens were invited to submit their own audition videos, where they needed to display why they should be picked as a finalist and of course a lip-sync to one of Ru’s hit songs. Twenty one lucky finalists were picked, all ranging in styles and talents, and they’ll battle it out on the 28th May at a live final in London in front of RuPaul, Jonathan Ross and Katie Price. For the debut of my new column, “Meow Mixx”, I spoke to some of the girls, to find out a little bit more about them.


 

 

 

Anna Phylatic

One of the prestigious #ManchesterQueens, Anna Phylatic is “a shock in a frock”, as well as a fierce party socialite and host to “Aftershock” in Manchester’s gay village. (Follow her on Twitter here)

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Emily: Do you think the UK is ready for Drag Race?

Anna: Yes, 100%! It’s the perfect time! So many fabulous and creative forms or drag popping up everywhere! I feel like I’m living in a very exciting time at the moment.

Emily: What would being named Rupaul’s Ambassador for the UK mean to you?

Anna: It would mean the world! To be chosen to represent the UK would be an honour and privilege! I was quite jokey and flippant in my audition, I do need a holiday, but I would take the position very seriously and represent my country to the best of my ability.

Emily: What do you think will make you stand out against the other queens?

Anna: I think my approach to drag is slightly off the wall and I think I’d probably stand out from the other queens because I don’t necessarily conform to the whole fishy femme thing, although I can do that too. I’m as happy being a drag zebra as I am being  a drag lampshade or alien from the planet Phylactic. I’m a playful drag queen. A drag clown. Drag is ridiculous and serious all rolled into one and I think I reflect that.

 

Miss Cairo

Supermodel of Norfolk, Miss Cairo is bundle of dazzling talent. (Follow her on Twitter here)

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Photo by Lee Edward (www.lee-edward.co.uk)

 

Emily: Do you think the UK is ready for Drag Race?

Cairo: I think the UK is definitely ready for RuPauls Drag Race, the real question is: Is the world ready for the UK drag scene?! I think because there is such a format to the show, a lot of people undermine the potential our drag has to offer. We aren’t all glamour queens, who know how to work a runway, our drag is really satirical, and doesn’t take itself too seriously. I think the bonding of our nations can be so positive, and it would be great to get RuPaul’s message of love to an even bigger audience!

Emily: What would being named Rupaul’s Ambassador for the UK mean to you?

Cairo: To me, being a RuPaul Ambassador would mean I get a larger platform to engage with and I am such a huge fan of the show. It would be an honour to bear the flame for the phenomenal scene we have, and be able to represent the UK, not by saying that I’m the best in the scene, but by being able to celebrate the diverse, colourful and amazingly talented queens of our country and help them reach wider audiences.

Emily: What do you think will make you stand out against the other queens?

Cairo: The reason why I think I stand out is that I’m not afraid to show you every angle of me. I’m diverse, I can be eloguent, and I am such a strong performer. I try hard to speak out what I think need speaking about, and I’m not afraid to put my head out on the line. I’m also so fucking pretty.

 

Vivienne

Liverpool’s sassiest queen, I spoke to Vivienne. (Follow her on Twitter here)

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Emily: Do you think the UK is ready for Drag Race?

Vivienne: I think the UK has been ready for drag race for long enough! Now is the time to grab the UK by its tuck!

Emily: What would being named Rupaul’s Ambassador for the UK mean to you?

Vivienne: Being an ambassador for RuPaul wouldn’t change much for me, as I’ve been ambassador for drag in the UK for many years! I’ve always spread the art form and shown it in a very positive light and doing it to a high standard! Winning the title of official Rupaul’s UK ambassador would be everything!

Emily: What do you think will make you stand out against the other queens?

Vivienne: I really think my professional, maturity and standard of drag will set me apart from the other queens! All cream tea no lamp shades; you won’t find a flaw! Wish me luck UK!

 

Eddie Adams

The “Glambassador” of Bedford, I spoke to the wonderful Eddie Ok Adams. (Follow her on Twitter here)

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Emily: Do you think the UK is ready for Drag Race?

Eddie: I absolutely think the UK is ready, in fact I think the UK has been ready for a long time. There’s a tremendous amount of talent here, and by talent I don’t mean just a pretty face and nice dresses. Due to the fact that lip syncing isn’t really considered a valid form of entertainment over here, you tend to find queens have to work a lot harder on the ways they entertain a crowd, which in turn means many of us have a broader range of skills and I absolutely think we should be showing them off!

Emily: What would being named Rupaul’s Ambassador for the UK mean to you?

Eddie: Winning competitions is always beneficial to your career and having Rupaul’s stamp of approval in particular can really open up avenues that were previously unobtainable to most performers in the industry. Beyond that however, I’ve always felt on the ‘outside’ of the drag world, in most cases other drag queens (until I get to know them) have often been quite dismissive of me, possibly because I’m not particularly “cool”. You won’t see me doing a death drop or ripping my wig off. I’ve only really dabbled in the club scene in London, I get booked mostly for private and corporate events so translating my performance from an hour long set that could be to a bunch of posh ladies at a garden party for example, to the club scene in Soho has always been a real struggle, which has had a profound impact on my relationships I’ve been able to cultivate with others in the profession. I think in this instance it would provide me with some real validation of my work from my peers, which is something I absolutely crave above all else. I’ve never been particularly interested in fame or earning huge sums of money, I just want to be the best Drag queen I can possibly be and anything else that follows as a by-product of that is an added extra.

Emily: What do you think will make you stand out against the other queens?

Eddie: I am by no means ‘in it to win it’ as it were, I hope the best woman wins, if it happens to be me, what a bonus to an already wonderful experience. I know a lot of these girls are going to be bringing their A game, there’s some seriously amazing drag queens in this competition and assuming I will stand out in anyway would be an insult to all of them. I am seasoned however, and confident which in this trade… is everything.

 

Kitty Powers

Game developer Kitty Powers is the hostess with the mostest, all round party girl, with her own drag queen video games! (Follow her on Twitter here)

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Emily: Do you think the UK is ready for Drag Race?

Kitty: I think that the UK is ready for RuPaul’s Drag Race but I can see why the various production companies involved seen tentative about it. There just aren’t as many queens in the UK, and it’s not quite as much of an ‘industry’ here. The UK has seen many legendary queens over the decades, but we definitely have a leaning towards comedy and theatrics rather than pageantry. That being said, I think the UK queens are capable of living up to the drag race standard, although the production company involved will need to be sensitive to what the UK queens have to offer, and also what the UK audience will want to see. I don’t think it needs to differ a lot from the US format but may need some cultural tweaks! I love a good tweak!

Emily: What would being named Rupaul’s Ambassador for the UK mean to you?

Kitty: I hope that it will inspire some young people, not only to realise that they don’t have to be what society tells them, but also that drag queens don’t need to fit a stereotype. Hopefully if they do make a full series of Drag Race UK, I’ll get to compete! Of course it would be good for my career and business as well, let’s not pussyfoot around the fact. My day job of making video games always needs publicity. Kitty Powers’ Matchmaker, available on iTunes, Google Play and Steam kittens! A trip to LA would also be nice, especially a gay pilgrimage to the set of Drag Race, although I don’t think two days will be enough!

Emily: What do you think will make you stand out against the other queens?

Kitty: I like to think I am evolving drag to new places and audiences with my video games. The games industry is huge and doesn’t have much of a drag presence at all. As far as I know, I am the first drag queen video game developer, and I want to spread a message of inclusiveness and diversity in my games without making them preachy, of course. I do like to experiment with my looks as well. I think drag is much more than just a sequin frock and a vintage wig. I do have those things in my wardrobe of course, but I like to mix it up and do some modern stuff too. Cosplay is actually a big inspiration to me!

 

Lady Portia

Lady Portia is stunning diva from Northern Ireland! (Follow her on Twitter here)

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Emily: Do you think the UK is ready for Drag Race?

Lady Portia: Yes, 100%! It started here in the UK by William Shakespeare when he would write in his stage directions “DR.ess A.s G.irl”. There is such a wealth of talent and diversity in the UK and Ireland’s drag scenes!

Emily: What would being named Rupaul’s Ambassador for the UK mean to you?

Lady Portia: I come from Northern Ireland, officially the most homophobic county in Europe. If I win I feel it would be one small step for change in my home country with my big heart and care for my fellow men! It would raise the profile of someone from Northern Ireland who is 100% comfortable in their own skin and happy to be openly gay, showing that yes, I’m gay but I don’t have horns, I’m not a pedophile and I’m not a sexual deviant! I’m a warm, funny and glamorous gal who tries to inspire the kids coming though the schools nowadays hearing how bad it is and how its wrong to be gay! They can see me and go yes, I love who I am and I don’t care what anyone else thinks!

Emily: What do you think will make you stand out against the other queens?

Lady Portia: To be honest, I’m not sure. Everyone sees something different in people and you never know what the judges are looking for. Every girl on that stage deserves to be there and who am I to say I’m better than anyone else? Everyone’s story is different. I guess mine is a sixteen year journey of drag in Northern Ireland. Working in some very troubled parts of the country you learn how to hold a room very quickly or you could be shoot dead! *laughs*

I’m great under pressure, I can speak to anyone and make them feel like they are the most important person in the world, I have time for everyone, and if something goes wrong, hand me mic or push play and I’ll talk or perform my way out of any mishap! All of the above is hard to display in a single catwalk and a lip sync to one of RuPaul’s amazing songs but I hope they can see something worthwhile in me! We have all been hand-picked by Ru so whatever happens, I think we are all winners as the first UK Drag Racers! *laughs*


 

We wish all our girls luck!

Catch RuPaul’s Drag Race on truTV, starting this June.

About Emily Meow 51 Articles
Featured writer from the across the pond. Wannabe Disney princess, harajuku lover and drag scene haunter.

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