The WERRRK.com Interview: Fifi DuBois

 

 


 

Chiffon Dior: Hi Fifi! How are you doing this evening?

Fifi DuBois: Just dandy, sitting at home enjoying a meal courtesy of seamless.com. I just finished a happy hour show at Boots and Saddle.

CD: How is the Sunday happy hour crowd? Is it mostly people who are still day drinking after brunch?

FD: It depends on the day. During the summer, it’s more of a post-brunch crowd, during fall and winter, it’s more faithful day drinkers.

CD: Bless those day drinkers hearts! So one thing I would like to discuss is how the drag scene in NYC is in a state of flux. How do you feel the scene has changed in the time you’ve been around?

FD: That’s the question of the decade, isn’t it? Well in my five plus years in the drag scene, I’ve worked in both Florida and New York City, which are two very different animals; pageant queens vs. showgirls. The problem I’ve noticed with the drag scene is whatI like to call the “Drag Race Baby Boom”. Ever since Rupaul’s Drag Race began, there has been an influx of young queens willing to work more often for less and less. I like to support these girls but at the same time, those of us who have worked hard for our place in the community deserve equal respect of those so lucky enough to be inducted into the elite group of “RuGirls.”

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CD: You said you’ve worked in both NYC and in Florida. How did you get your start in the drag business? How do you feel each locale has influenced your development as performer?

FD: My first ever drag performance was in college as a part my school’s (SUNY Purchase) annual drag competition ,”Fall Ball”. I entered because I grew up in the competitive dance scene and I always loved a challenge. I was confident I could win, but unfortunately, I did not. I ended up honing my drag both through joining a Rocky Horror Shadow cast (the Cheap Little Punks) in Tampa, as well by as competing in amateur talent contests at the now defunct Valentines show bar. Through both experiences, I learned about both individuality and originality as well as gained more polish and poise, all while being able to dance the house down thanks to my BFA from Purchase College.

CD: With some of the bigger queens in the city moving on, there is the beginning of a vacuum. Who do you think is poised to fill the void?

FD: I definitely see Bob the Drag Queen going places! Also there’s a need for a token Asian queen so I nominate Yuhua Hamasaki, Digna Shei, and Tara Miso Rice to battle it out. There is also the obvious void of Miss Dallas Dubois (NO RELATION!), but I humbly nominate myself to take her place.

CD: I didn’t realize the DuBois name was like Highlander, in the end there can be only one!

FD: Exactly! Now I gotta take out all those New Orleans Dubois!

 

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CD: What do you think you bring the scene that is unique?

FD: I like to think i don’t bring just strong dance technique and entertainment, but also comedy and quick mic skills. I believe I posess everything that is sought after in the ideal drag queen these days. I dance, I sing (okay, at best), I tell jokes, I can do the splits, plus I can drink you out of house and home, all before 4am.

CD: You mentioned earlier that Florida was more pageant queens. Since I know you’re involved in pageants yourself, including the fabulous Miss’d America pageant in Atlantic City, did you develop the pageant bug while you were down in the Sunshine State?

FD: I’m the Susan Lucci of NYC drag! I’ve competed in Miss Stonewall, Miss Hell’s Kitchen, Miss Boots and Saddle, as well as So You Think You Can Drag and I’m always a finalist or runner up. To me, that means I’ve got what it takes, but my time will come.

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I actually caught the bug officially at last years Miss’d America (in Atlantic City). I intend on competing with ten times as much gusto since I felt like last year was just “testing the waters” for me. I also hope to compete in the first Miss New York EOY (Entertainer of the Year), as well as Miss Gay America among others within the upcoming pageant season. Of course, that’s not forgetting all of the aforementioned local NYC pageants as well!

CD: What does the future hold for you Fifi? What’s on your drag bucket list of goals?

FD: My ultimate drag goals include headlining my own show in Las Vegas, starting my own Drag/dance production show/company. Much like Goddess in “Showgirls” meets the Radio city Rockettes , only I’m Crystal/Nomi and the Rockettes are Drag Starlets! Like the world gayest cruise line production show and I’ve done some pretty gay cruise production shows in my day!

 

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CD: Thank you much for your time Fifi. I wish you the best of luck as you go forward in the future. For our readers here in the NYC area, where can they see you werk?

FD: I werk all over the city so for constant updates, they can follow me on Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube. I work at Bartini on Friday and Saturday nights from 11 to close, Saturday Happy Hour at Fairytail Lounge from 6 to 10 pm, and at Boots and Saddle from 3 to 5:30 for happy hour plus I do guest gigs anywhere and everywhere!

 

About Chiffon Dior 474 Articles
Despite being a drag journalist for over five years, Chiffon only recently realized that she missed a golden opportunity back then to change her drag name to Rhoda Story.

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